Find a job in Canada

Thursday, 30 June 2011 | Views: 16258

This section will help you understand all you need to do to find work in Canada. It provides you with essential steps to help you learn how to find and get the job you want in Canada. This process will take time, but completing each task below as thoroughly as possible will give you and your family members the best chance to achieve your career plans.

More than ever, Canada is in need of qualified workers in a range of professions. From nurses to miners, food servers to IT professionals, employers in Canada are increasingly looking beyond their own borders to meet their employment needs.

When living abroad, finding a job in Canada can seem like a daunting task. Thankfully, a few tips can help demystify the process, and with a little luck you could be on your way to a new life and career in Canada!

Step 1: Know the Job Market

Before looking for jobs, you should take some time to learn about the labour environment for your specific occupation in Canada. It is important to ask yourself important questions about your job search goals, such as:

  • What is the average salary for my job in Canada? Does it vary by location?

You can use the PayScale Salary Calculator to find the answer to this question.

  • What are my rights as a worker?

All Canadians are entitled to a minimum wage and vacation benefits. Social benefits such as healthcare may vary from province to province.

  • Do I need Federal/Provincial certification to practice in Canada?

Are my skills in high demand in a certain part of Canada?

Is my job considered ‘high’ or ‘low’ skilled in Canada?

Step 2: Search for a Job

There is no ‘right’ way to search for a job in Canada. A good place to start is to think of any connections you might have in the country. Look through your social networks to find out if you have friends or family (or friends-of-friends, etc) with ties to Canada or your profession. If you have no personal ties, you may want to consider contacting professionals working in your field in Canada and asking to speak with them informally in order to learn more about the job market.

Of course, you do not need a professional network in Canada in order to begin your job search. There are a number of Canadian job posting websites that you may use to start your search today. The NiceJob Search Tool, which accesses job postings from across the country, is a good place to start.

When applying for jobs, it is important to remember that Canadian employers may look for certain things that differ from employers in your home country. For instance, it is important to provide a resume that conforms to Canadian professional standards. You can use the resume builder to make sure yours is up to par. If you are applying for any job opening, it is beneficial to include a cover letter explaining your qualifications and interest in the job.

Step 3: Securing a Job Offer

If you make it to step 3, congratulations! You are closer than ever to arriving in Canada. A job offer from a Canadian employer may be issued on either a temporary or permanent basis. Both can help bring you to Canada, but there are different processes for each. Usually, a Canadian employer will formally hire you by issuing a job offer letter. For immigration purposes, it is helpful that the job offer letter includes the following information:

  • Salary and benefits
  • Working hours
  • Description of job duties
  • Printed on company letterhead
  • Signed by employer and employee

For semi-skilled occupations, the Federal government requires the use of a standardized employment contract, if you are being hired from abroad.

Important note: While rare, fraudulent job offers do occur. You should exercise good judgement when receiving a job offer from an employer abroad. Remember that a genuine offer of employment will not ask you to pay money or provide your credit card information.

Step 4: Come to Canada

An offer of temporary employment can be issued for varying lengths of time, from a few days to a few years. If successful, you will receive a Temporary Work Permit to work in this position. You will come to Canada for a specified period of time as a temporary foreign worker, and you will be restricted to working only for the job written on your permit. If you do wish to change employers once in Canada, you would need to apply for and receive a new work permit. This can be done from inside Canada.

If your offer of employment is permanent in nature, you can use it as support for a permanent residency application. Many popular immigration programs, such as the Federal Skilled Worker Program, have streams dedicated to processing applications that include a full-time Canadian job offer. While the Federal Skilled Worker Program has placed a strict cap on application intake, individuals with arranged employment in Canada are not subject to these caps.

Whether temporary or permanent, a job in Canada will give you invaluable experience, and may be a stepping stone for a future life in the country. For some, a job will fall into place quickly, while for others the search may last longer. No matter what, it is important to keep your focus on your ultimate personal and professional goals. With persistence, you can make them a reality.

Interested in learning more? Look what the government says! Click here

Finding a job offer is not the only way to come to Canada. To find out if you qualify for Canadian Permanent Residency without a job offer, please fill out a free online assessment today.

Remember, your stay in Canada is meant to be exciting, fun, and culturally enriching!

The Shortest Path to Your Next Job:

www.hrjob.ca www.jobwings.com www.accountingjobs.ca www.salesrep.ca www.itjobs.ca www.retail.ca www.adminjobs.ca www.callcentrejob.ca www.techjobs.ca www.pharmajob.ca www.healthcarejob.ca www.legaljobs.ca www.paralegaljobs.ca www.aerojobs.ca www.pmjobs.ca www.bajobs.ca www.part-time.ca www.temporaryjobs.ca www.summerjobs.ca www.winterjobs.ca

Useful career resources:

www.resignation.ca www.cv.ca www.ratemyemployer.ca

DISCLAIMER:

The content of this article is intended to provide a general guide to the subject matter and does not constitute legal advice. Immigration rules are constantly evolving and we do our best to keep you informed. MBC specialist advice should be sought regarding your specific circumstances. Email your comments or questions to info@iccrcmember.com

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